Oregon Oversize / Overweight Regulations

What is considered as "Oversized Load" in Oregon?

Dimensions: Width: 8' 6" Height: 14' Semi Trailer Length: 56' Maximum Length: 75' (combinations) Overhang: Front 4' , Rear 5'

What is considered as "Overweight Load" in Oregon?

Weights: Single Axle: 20,000 lb. Tandem axle: 34,000 lb. Tridem: 48,000 lb. Max Gross Weight: 80,000 lb.

Oregon Oversize / Overweight Permits

Oregon Permit Department Contact Information

503-373-0000

Fax: 503-378-2873

7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Pacific

http://www.oregontruckingonline.com

Oregon Pilot Cars / Escorts

Oklahoma has a publication dedicated to the requirements for Pilot cars. The state is divided up into different districts and the requirements for pilot cars varies from on district to another.

For each highway in the state, pilot vehicle(s) may be required based on the vehicle's or load's width, height, overall length and overhang.

Refer to:  State and District Guidelines — Pilot Cars and other Special Requirements  for additional information.

Oregon Axle Regulations

Maximum Legal Weights Allowed

Per in. of Tire Width      600 lb.

Single Axle                     20,000 lb.

Tandem                          34,000 lb.                

Gross Weight                80,000 lb.


Maximum Permit Weight

Maximum Allowed:       Between 80,000 lb. and 105,500 lb.

Single Axle                    21,500 lb.

Tandem Axle                 43,000 lb.

Annual Continuous      98,000 lb.

Additional Data

Up to 48,000 pounds per tandem axle may be allowed if the combination of vehicles has at least 9 axle with a steer axle followed by four consecutive tandem axles which are 8 foot wide (standard).

Up to 52,800 pounds may be allowed when the combination has 10 foot wide axles with 4 tires per axle.

Up to 60,000 pounds may be allowed when the combination has 10 foot wide axles with 8 tires per axle.

Single Trip Permits

Up to 48,000 pounds per tandem axle may be allowed if the combination of vehicles has at least 9 axles with a steer axle followed by four consecutive tandem axles which are 8 foot wide (standard).

Up to 52,800 pounds may be allowed when the combination has 10 foot wide axles with 4 tires per axle.

Up to 60,000 pounds may be allowed when the combination has 10 foot wide axles with 8 tires per axle.

Common Uses for Annual Permits

Extended Weight, allowing up to 105,500 pounds gross weight, when hauling a divisible load.

Overwidth when hauling a single, non-divisible load.

Oregon Trip and Fuel (IRP / IFTA) Permits

Trip Permit From Another State

You can drive in Oregon using your valid trip permit from another state. You must keep proof of insurance in the vehicle.

Heavy Motor Vehicle Trip Permit

Trip permits must be obtained PRIOR to operation. Motor carriers need this permit if:

Note: The truck driver must have the Registration or Cab Card for information.

Cost: $43 fee for 10 consecutive days.

Heavy Trailer Trip Permit

A permit is required for trailers that are not registered already.

Allows the use of unregistered:

  • Trailers with a loaded weight (ORS 801.330) over 8,000 pounds;
  • Fixed load trailers; or
  • Special use trailers.

Cost: $10 fee for 10 consecutive days.

Temporary Pass

Motor carriers are issued this permit when:

  • Validate payment of the weight mile tax is received up front.
  • The combined gross weight of truck, trailer and load exceeds 26,000 pounds.

Note: The max number of Temporary passes for an account is five or more for one unit or 35 in a rolling 12 month period.

 

Oregon Overweight / Oversize Fines

The presumptive fines under Schedule I are as provided in this subsection. If the excess weight is:

One thousand pounds or less, the presumptive fine is $100.
More than 1,000 pounds, but not in excess of 2,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is $150.
More than 2,000 pounds, but not in excess of 3,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is $200.
More than 3,000 pounds, but not in excess of 5,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is $300.
More than 5,000 pounds, but not in excess of 7,500 pounds, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to 15 cents per pound for each pound of the excess weight.
More than 7,500 pounds, but not in excess of 10,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to 16 cents per pound for each pound of the excess weight.
More than 10,000 pounds, but not in excess of 12,500 pounds, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to 20 cents for each pound of the excess weight.
More than 12,500 pounds over the allowable weight, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to 24 cents per pound for each pound of excess weight.
The presumptive fines under Schedule II are as provided in this subsection. If the excess weight is:
One hundred pounds, but not in excess of 5,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to $200 plus 10 cents per pound of the excess weight.
More than 5,000 pounds, but not in excess of 10,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to $350 plus 15 cents per pound of the excess weight.
More than 10,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is an amount equal to $600 plus 30 cents per pound of the excess weight.
One hundred pounds, but not in excess of 5,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is $200 plus 15 cents per pound for each pound of the excess weight.
More than 5,000 pounds but not in excess of 10,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is $350 plus 20 cents per pound for each pound of excess weight.
More than 10,000 pounds, the presumptive fine is $500, plus 30 cents per pound for each pound of excess weight.

Source link: https://oregon.public.law/statutes/ors_818.430

Running Hours and Holiday Restrictions

Warning Lights

End load lights are required for operation when visibility is less than 500 feet due to darkness or reduced visibility.

Traveling at night with a wide load, the outermost extremities must be illuminated by lamps or marker lights (amber forward and intermediate side markers, red rearward markers).

When width exceeds 10′ on a two-lane highway, or 12′ on a multi-lane highway, amber warning lights are required, on the cab (unless operating with a minimum of two pilot cars).

"Oversized Load" Banner Requirements

“Oversize Load” are required on front of tractor and rear of load or trailer on all wide loads and vehicle/loads over 80′ long. Size: 7' wide, 18" high Letters: Black, 10" high, Background: Yellow.

Flag Requirements

Red/fluorescent orange flag not less than 18 inches square attached to the outermost extremity of the load during daylight hours.


Flags, Lights and Banners

One-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset seven days a week from Labor Day to Memorial Day.

Memorial Day to Labor Day, Saturday travel only until noon and none on Sunday, except not exceeding 14 feet wide can travel weekend, daytime hours only on Interstate highways west of the summit of the Cascade Mountains, and on any authorized highway east of the summit of the Cascade Mountains.

Up to 10 feet wide on “green” routes and up to 12 feet wide on Interstates are allowed night travel.

Local restriction apply in Portland, Eugene, Grants Pass and other areas.

Oregon Tire Regulations

Checking Your Pressure

Use a tire gauge to check inflation pressure, measured in in PSI.

Tread Depth

Tread equals traction—giving your tires a grip on the road, especially in bad weather. Lose too much tread and you could lose control.

Minimum tread depth is 2/32nds of an inch.

Chains

Tire chains are required when conditions demand because of snow, ice or other inclement weather and SNOW ZONE signs are posted.

Oregon Annual Permits

Annual Dims:

  • Length: 105′
  • Width: 16′
  • Height: Depends on routes

Cost: Depend on if you want only interstate or if you need to include city street which are county roads

Time to received the permits: 1 business day

Applications received: online

Specific Commodites? yes, some permits are commodity specific

Route Specific? No

 

Oregon Road Conditions

Work zone crashes are serious for Workers and Drivers. Road construction is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States therefore the government of Oregon has similar safety tips like other states across the US.

Safety Tips for Drivers

· Pay attention to the driving task.

· When you see orange signs, barrels, cones, and barricades – slow down.

· Obey all speed zone signs and don’t tailgate.

· Move safely into the correct lane well in advance.

· Be Alert! Work Zones can have narrow lanes, closed lanes, closed shoulders, and workers very close to live traffic.

· When possible, move over for highway workers – Give workers more room between you and them.

· Expect Delays — Plan for work zone delays. Leave earlier if you can. Be patient and drive safely through work zones.

· Plan your trip. Start planning in advance by using www.TripCheck.com or TripCheck Mobile (www.TripCheck.com/mobile) to  avoid work zones if possible.

Oregon Manufactured Houses and Mobile homes

Specific information in regards to moving oversized mobile & manufactured homes can be found by clicking the link in this section. Specific information ranges from fees, to road restrictions, pilot/escort cars and traveling times.


Oversize / Overweight Regulations By State